It's okay to receive ballpark figures over the phone however, insist upon an in-home estimate. A quality painter will help point out why certain parts of the project might be more expensive and can even talk through the repair process if it's necessary. A painter should also ask questions regarding access to the painting site, where they should park and if any HOA rules prohibit hours of work.
Three referrals should be enough to assess the quality of work as well as the communication skills of the painter. Ask about the overall quality of the work, the work style of the painter, how the work has held up over time, and if they would hire him or her again. Be wary of any professional that refuses to give you references; a quality painter should be happy to have to speak to past clients.
In my opinion the information on this page should be modified as for the pricing for my area is not correct and the information here could damage the expectations of my or another painting companies pricing. There are too many situations that there is not a way to specify cost prior to seeing the actual house and that information needs to be in big print on this page.
Hello, I have a sad situation to share -- a friend of mine who is a very good painter, experienced too, fell off a tall ladder that did not have "boots" on it. (I've never seen those.) Anyway, do you think he should have asked for boots before painting? Possibly it was a situation where he was shy to ask because he wanted the job... (I don't know all the details.)
If you talk with a painting contractor long enough, you’ll inevitably hear; “There’s no good help out there.” It’s easy to hide behind this excuse, but it’s not true. There are plenty of reliable painters out there, business owners just don’t take the time to find them. It takes TIME to find good people, time you wouldn’t have if you were busy painting.
If you talk with a painting contractor long enough, you’ll inevitably hear; “There’s no good help out there.” It’s easy to hide behind this excuse, but it’s not true. There are plenty of reliable painters out there, business owners just don’t take the time to find them. It takes TIME to find good people, time you wouldn’t have if you were busy painting.
Another factor to consider is the height and features of your home. An example would be a house completely trimmed in Cement Fiber, which does chalk if you do not purchase the correct paint and apply enough of it. Some houses in Coastal Areas are already on 15+ft Stilts (off ground) and then another 20ft high at times. This requires rental equipment and careful cost estimation based on the difficulty of the overall project, The best advice that I can give is to get several estimates in your area and make a decision a couple of weeks afterwards. You will "weed out" per se the individuals that do not have the patience to finish a project that was started-as well as those who haggle you for payment (sometimes daily) before project is completed. I have heard some wild stories from a lot of Homeowners. Common sense and your intuition will make you aware of anyone that you should not hire.
O'Neil patches shallow holes and divots with Ready Patch because it dries fast, sands smooth, and stays flexible. Deep cracks and rotten spots are best repaired with two-step epoxies, such as those made by Advanced Repair Technology. (For a step-by-step instructions, see Repairing Rot with Epoxy.) The days of using polyester auto-body fillers on wood are over. "They cure too hard," says Portland, Oregon–based painting contractor Kathleen George. "They look good at first, but then they peel away."
Over the past year I have had several jobs given to 2 Angie's list recommendations and 1 not from a recommendation. They all have one thing in common, lack of sufficient and correct preparation to save time, labor, and the fact that they put a person in charge that was a cut corners type of worker. The two from Angie's list sent worker/s back to try touch up problems, but once the job is not prepared correctly in the first place any extra work is like putting a band-aid on a dirty wound.
Painting the exterior of your house is about more than just curb appeal. The right paint provides a protective layer between your home and the elements, preventing costly damage to siding, trim and other materials. With proper prep work and the right paint for the job, you can expect your home’s paint job to look great and stand up to the conditions for several years.
We used FHP to paint the interior of our home and  were very satisfied with their work. Joe, the owner, was always available to answer any questions I had. He put up samples for us in each room so we could choose the best color. They prepped the house well and the end product was more than expected! His price was fair compared to competitors. FHP finished the project in a timely manner . He even offered to come back and touch up the paint after we have moved in ! I would recommend FHP for any job!
Based in the United Kingdom, Ian Linton has been a professional writer since 1990. His articles on marketing, technology and distance running have appeared in magazines such as “Marketing” and “Runner's World.” Linton has also authored more than 20 published books and is a copywriter for global companies. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in history and economics from Bristol University.
They painted our home exterior about 12 years ago and did the interior about 9 years ago as part of a major remodel. As it was time to re-paint the exterior again, we used James Lee again, and were very glad we did. In walking around to find 'punch list' corrections after they were done, there was pretty much nothing to find - they did a great job. They even used Henry's roof patch to fill in a gap on the roof. Kept everything clean and no over painting - great job.
As you walk through your lighted rooms (preferably day light) see if the new coat has light spots showing the precious paint. This is call "bleeding through". This means that there's only one coat of paint or the paint was diluted or the trasition of colors were from light to dark (or the other way around) and primer was not use or the painter is inexperienced.
Beginning with the prep work and ending with last coat of paint or the finishing, an exterior paint job will last anywhere from one to two weeks. After completion, homeowners using low-quality paint will need to repaint every four or five years to keep it well maintained; homeowners using high-quality paint can go longer without a new coat -- usually about seven or eight years, depending on the type of paint and material.  
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