Contractors apply several layers of paint to achieve a suitable finish. They leave the first coat to dry for the recommended time and apply one or more finishing coats. They might choose paints with special qualities for different types of room. Manufacturers have developed paints for bathrooms or kitchens that have good resistance to moisture for example. When they have completed painting, they clear away any equipment and restore the area to its original condition.
OF the different type of customers there are at least two: cheap charley's and people who want great results. I agree the need for wall repair is critical to the end results. Most critical is for the customer to be told ahead that the walls are going to need exactly what is needed. This means the contractor must look, touch, examine the walls for defects and needed work. I've been a building manager for 40 years and seen a few paint jobs. Typically a contractor does a lot of talking about how expert he is, but the guys who walk through with note pads, iPads, examine, measure, point things out, explain and recommend are the ones I will deal with. It confirms if they know what the business. Nobody likes the workers to show up and when you talk about the job they're going to do they know nothing but they we were told to be here. Their boss who bid the job doesn't supervise - a big no no around here. Nobody likes surprises or worse, at the end of a job that's not right getting a bunch of little kid excuses. Contractors that do not like the customer to be around looking at the progress don't get the job. Click Here Painting Contractors Denver, CO
This is an area that interior painters can easily cut short to save time. Most contracts don't state the extent of the wall repairs included, so it's up to the painter's discretion how much they will do. If it seems like too much work, they'll usually point out the repairs but don't include it in the bid. They'll then ask you if you'd like it fixed after they start your project and let you know how much more it will cost.
Prep. For new work the painter accepts the finish done by the drywall or plaster and once he accepts the work and starts painting he owns any wall repairs. Existing work is a different thing. I take a high intensity light and circle the kinds of defects with chalk so we are all in agreement before they start. Sometimes this results in a higher price and we have to compromise on how much to do...

To industrial and institutional. I also own and operate a professional painting company of elite painters ONLY 5 ELITE PAINTERS, and pay them good money for being elite. Less is better in my opinion.The fact is this a homeowner and a painting company owner can both be taken advantage of by hustlers and liars and amateurs posing as pros. I have had many laborers tell me they can paint. " Oh yes sir I can paint, I'm a painter of 8 years. Yes sir I can cut a straight line." Some people will say and do anything to get a buck. If yoir on the job to see their rookie mistakes you may have time to save your reputation before disaster ensues and fire them on the spot. As a painting Company owner if your not on the job with your crew at least 3 out of 6 days every week your taking a huge risk of damaging your reputation and losing the respect of your team. Homeowners want to deal with you or the crew boss (jobs site supervisor) not "the painter". Many things I have read are right on. Painters for the most part will milk a clock for all they can and still do a good job. But amateurs will leave your projects in shambles and the only ones to pay for it is the contractor and the homeowners. But an elite painter and crew will try to complete a project as quickly as possible and move on to the next one. They understand bonuses, incentives, and promotions. My company provides the opportunity for a homeowner to meet each member of the crew and shake there hand on day one. There is also a differentiation between the crew boss and the crew by the uniforms they wear. Should the homeowners have any issue at all they know exactly who to go to to get results. This eliminates the age old problem of who screwed up? I have found that by me putting on my whites and giving my crew the opportunity to out do themselves on each project it ignites competition, pride in skill, and excellent commraderie amongst the team. We all hold each other accountable. Choose your contractor by the crew not the owner. The crew is a direct reflection of the Company owner. No room for rookies on fine finish painting. Go pro for painting and you won't regret it. With that being said homeowners should always remember that you get what you pay for. With paint and services. In most cases it will be well worth a few extra bucks to get elite results. Never go with the cheapest bid there is always a reason why it's so low.

Wow, James Lee's painters are amazing- David and his team were professional, worked incredibly fast, did not make mistakes, and even did some extra work for us free of charge. This is one of the best businesses I have ever found through yelp over the last 10+ years. We got three different bids to paint our home and James Lee's was significantly lower than our highest but also quite a bit more than our lowest (although I do believe the lowest bid painters were planning on painting much less & cutting some corners). James gave us the most professional & comprehensive bid we received, just as others have mentioned. He had a wonderful portfolio of work and I am so glad we chose his painters for our home. Apparently James Lee gets a price cut from Dunn Edwards Paint because they purchase A LOT of paint and it 100% felt like this discount was passed on to my family.
We’re able to complete your painting quickly while giving you high quality results because we use a technique and system perfected over more than 8 years, along with the right number of professional painters. We’re so confident that we’ll provide the quality you expect in a timeline that’s unexpected that we back up our service with a written 5 year warranty. The quality you expect, backed by a 5 year warranty.
Hello, I have a sad situation to share -- a friend of mine who is a very good painter, experienced too, fell off a tall ladder that did not have "boots" on it. (I've never seen those.) Anyway, do you think he should have asked for boots before painting? Possibly it was a situation where he was shy to ask because he wanted the job... (I don't know all the details.)

They painted our home exterior about 12 years ago and did the interior about 9 years ago as part of a major remodel. As it was time to re-paint the exterior again, we used James Lee again, and were very glad we did. In walking around to find 'punch list' corrections after they were done, there was pretty much nothing to find - they did a great job.
On the surface, painting a house seems to be a relatively simple, straightforward task. The idea is basically to get the paint onto a section of wall in an even, continuous fashion without wasting too much in the process. The fact is, though this is the majority of what painting a house involves, it can be a lot more strenuous and difficult than many people think. Sure, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to slop some paint on a roller and go to town, but you don't want to forget about all the prep-work, clean-up, and technique that go into a professional paint job. Add to that the fact that most homeowners do not own the same kind of equipment that a professional Sacramento house painter is likely to have, and the magnitude of this task begins to take shape.

When selecting a color scheme for the home’s exterior homeowners can choose color options that will correct flaws that they may feel exist with their home and property.  Some examples include utilizing two shades of a single color to make a home appear appropriately sized when the home may be too large or too tall.  To accomplish this effect individuals will want to place the darker tone on the upper level of the home’s exterior.  Smaller windows can appear more proportionately sized by trimming them in a lighter tone of paint.  Darker colors make a space or feature appear smaller.  The same effect can be obtained for homes positioned further away from a curb.  By using lighter tones the home will not feel camouflaged.
Hello, I have a sad situation to share -- a friend of mine who is a very good painter, experienced too, fell off a tall ladder that did not have "boots" on it. (I've never seen those.) Anyway, do you think he should have asked for boots before painting? Possibly it was a situation where he was shy to ask because he wanted the job... (I don't know all the details.)
David took so much pride in his work and was really wonderful about communicating with us each step of the way. His crew painted the interior AND exterior of our home in maybe a week or less. I love how they painted our pipes outside of the house to match the colors- I'll attach a picture to show what I mean. Their attention to detail was fantastic! They seriously did not miss a spot and there was zero paint in any place that it wasn't supposed to be!
My wife and I just painted the interior of our house with about 6-8 gallons, of $30+ per gallon (meaning the good stuff, non-diluted) with absolutely fantastic results. However we just paid an average of $5 per gallon. Reason...all big box stores have paint, set aside, that has been mixed but not picked up by the customer. They need to sell it quick and if you're not in a hurry (you know well in advance that a room or two need painting and it's not like the roof leaking and needs an immediate fix) you can go to each store when you need other supplies or food, like Walmart (when convenient, driving 20 miles to each is not worth it) and over the course of a month or two, pick out some very nice colors of quality paint. We found perfect colors...not saying they were our first choice but when we opened the can, very nice and some even better than our original picks. Cost to paint the entire house was about $100, with all materials included, period. We had it on the market for a few months to sell, didn't sell, painted the rooms, got 2 offers the day after we finished, took the best one and never looked back.
When their bids are successful, contractors meet customers to finalize their requirements and plan the order and timing of work. Contractors estimate the time required for surface preparation, painting several coats and drying time between coats. For interior painting jobs, they might have to allow time for clearing rooms. Exterior painting schedules might be dependent on the weather in different parts of the country. Exterior painting is not practical in very wet or very cold conditions.
I agree with you Richard, as a painting contractor for very many years, people are always looking to get more and more out of you. I had to give an estimate to a lady a few weeks ago who had more stuff around her home than a thrift store including heavy furniture, stuff all over the floor and junk everywhere. I knew if I accepted the job id be a furniture mover and cleaner. I also agree this article makes it seem like the contractor is out to rip off the customers. Fact is I always leave doing more work than agreed upon. It doesn't bother me since the customer is always satisfied. Just saying
 I started my young life as a yacht painter in my grandfather's boat shop at 12 and have been painting and house building all my life. We built boats of wood because we had nothing better, we built homes of wood because we had nothing better. I grew up putting wood siding (cedar, redwood) on houses, it was the best we had. Now I tell people use cement siding, paint it once every thirty years if it needs it or not.

Consider purchasing supplies personally to save money. Ask the painter for a bid that separates labor and materials. Then explain that you'll purchase the materials and ask for a list of exactly what will be needed to complete the job. Caulking, for example, is an extra supply commonly used to fill any cracks or damaged areas in your walls -- and one that might be overlooked in an incomplete list.
Yes the pricing does change, and quite significantly. I have worked inside the paint industry on counter sales outside sales and application for over 10 years. One thing many people do not understand is, the resins in the paint are more expensive to produce the higher the sheen goes. Therefore the company is at of higher cost making the paint, which in terms they charge more for the paint. I have seen a 15$ variance between flat-semi-gloss it is not uncommon and is not unrealistic to pay more for a higher sheen. Another thing to add is when doing samples on your wall prior to a painter coming is a good idea, however do not do them in huge squares with heavy coats, remember you are just wanting an idea. A lot of times the issue comes up of the paint not covering the sample coats, in fact it is covering quite well, however the paint sample applied is often times much darker than the wall color, creating a contrasting difference from the lighter surrounding wall and the sample placed on the wall. I recommend getting a piece of sheet rock and using it for the samples so you can move around with it etc.
The best time of the year to paint your home is typically in late spring and early summer when it’s warm outside and moisture is low. This can change based on your geographic location. For example, fall can be a good time to paint in California when the difference between high and low temperatures is low. Your painter will select the optimal time to start your exterior painting project.
Wilson & Hampton provides the premier system for coating metal surfaces. Electrostatic painting is an efficient process where you can upgrade and rejuvenate your entire office or factory area in your choice of finishes at a fraction of the re-placement cost. Cabinets, lockers, machinery, Bathroom Partitions and much more can be painted in-shop or on-site by drawing the paint directly to the metal surface to be painted and “wrapping” around it, leaving no drips, spatter, or over spray.
{ "galleryConfig" : {"galleryTitle":"Videos","galleryItems":[{"id":null,"title":"Structural Repair","url":"http://vimeo.com/229142342","mediaSources":null,"description":"Hazards and proper protection while cutting, grinding, welding.","duration":"5:33","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649374900_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOiUDl4xTsMb8+0quFv997QgNdWvZz2Mbmg8j7OjOgbVQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGP+jFPOyZ3ee6DwfQI8JX24ZFxnZmPEyIqLsTlFciGOsw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Surface Preparation","url":"http://vimeo.com/229114680","mediaSources":null,"description":"Sanding, body filler, solvent wipe down, masking.","duration":"5:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649340426_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMPQ/0SzwNC3qxmyzA8rh00JfmhCsY9z0rrOPlnSeOSvA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMqwTDDrdISKJcoFG8R0GddY6B6Mr2/EiEafjBSbL0SbQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Painting","url":"http://vimeo.com/229184542","mediaSources":null,"description":"Mixing coatings, spraying paint, gun cleaning, unmasking.","duration":"12:37","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649429175_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNhkGLICbyNlpZf/0EhR5YbWUtqEe8183loncNEzZwGsA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeNJ2dENagcj+OrbkimC85zy6ras5C1T9u1nBUl9fGxnYg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Overview)","url":"http://vimeo.com/229115324","mediaSources":null,"description":"Choosing the best type respirator for your tasks, fit testing","duration":"03:49","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649341202_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNtImajjNHe6jARBiHcD6VuepuJy0zv0FvKpqmb8JUNRg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGOSyvZoO5VShIctdMhYrO1ZSYUXz4tfP32j02f90eXfFw== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Cleaning and Storage)","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865270","mediaSources":null,"description":"How to clean and maintain your respirator.","duration":"1:46","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649027412_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf4nf0pOeIZcw+VAfgeGBpy0AaSxT7b2QvnLKXY3ZpVyuQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf6dcUZO3dHOxWIvJ+SgFrwgcao7j60JKvPDJahmfVir4Q== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Respiratory Protection (Donning a Half Mask Respirator) ","url":"http://vimeo.com/229146171","mediaSources":null,"description":"Putting on (donning) and fitting a respirator, pressure checks.","duration":"1:57","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649379748_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGMkSWDfi0it7h5AX6KfLIovgb+7GyvMtXXt34r9qBjDXQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNa9+q+2lXYwFigwR5wFjtuqcyyAuBkZmAv86gMxzrunQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Chemical Resistant Gloves","url":"http://vimeo.com/228970893","mediaSources":null,"description":"Gloves to protect against solvents, isocyanates and dusts","duration":"02:23","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649161993_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8hjG/6VSgBBA23GFpzQ5vrSEdT1sdNAWrIfRJelqOAEQg== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4ApusfQtYkvFK3xf1J9Yh8iVC8uiDwyTy73nbFlsCCU1jmdouKKtJvd5XCoIF3RLrg== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Isocyanate Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229123604","mediaSources":null,"description":"Isocyanates can cause asthma and airway irritation .","duration":"6:06","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649351377_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGM+LTxO7+opIKVkifEOFsC6cAa7qyBAOoTwcZcKylUeIQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4BQgbAg4nbVFeaPAz7ndMGNToiixt8ivhkn14FvljjLq4oFgFgi/rZZhhOSDo3Qe5A== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Solvent Health Hazards","url":"http://vimeo.com/229167358","mediaSources":null,"description":"Effects of solvent exposure: skin, nervous system, liver, etc.","duration":"03:26","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649407194_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BePhRTr7dbZIdQdP6K/RHlVvJZ33hOEbslHHahu2n/+qzQ== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JG68n7USdqX5tmxic46BeMUXLf4Bhuxq/WQ0stgUJ8ofKafv4dkRuhy+ly27/70MQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0},{"id":null,"title":"Sources of Information","url":"http://vimeo.com/228865887","mediaSources":null,"description":"MSDSs, routes of exposure, signs and symptoms of exposure","duration":"03:30","thumbnailUrl":"http://i.vimeocdn.com/video/649028172_640.jpg","thumbnailUrlResized":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf5/d77jNMgv0uxh2lleucWIelZHfuxL/Y9qMtSOvx87sA== 1x","thumbnailUrlResizedModal":"https://cdn2.medicine.yale.edu/url/6arvl7mGocI2gMSMhmhX4JuN0jchEY8zjiCfQB+kYf60tYR5hWn95e5+iSGICXG5Ty9pruywoJUwZiJy1iK/lQ== 1x","galleryItemType":2,"credit":null,"transcriptUrl":null,"transcriptText":null,"illustrationCredit":null,"ComponentTemplate":null,"Page":null,"PagePosition":0}],"itemsToLoadIds":[],"slideRowsCount":0}, "displayStyle": "video-gallery-widget" }
Yes the pricing does change, and quite significantly. I have worked inside the paint industry on counter sales outside sales and application for over 10 years. One thing many people do not understand is, the resins in the paint are more expensive to produce the higher the sheen goes. Therefore the company is at of higher cost making the paint, which in terms they charge more for the paint. I have seen a 15$ variance between flat-semi-gloss it is not uncommon and is not unrealistic to pay more for a higher sheen. Another thing to add is when doing samples on your wall prior to a painter coming is a good idea, however do not do them in huge squares with heavy coats, remember you are just wanting an idea. A lot of times the issue comes up of the paint not covering the sample coats, in fact it is covering quite well, however the paint sample applied is often times much darker than the wall color, creating a contrasting difference from the lighter surrounding wall and the sample placed on the wall. I recommend getting a piece of sheet rock and using it for the samples so you can move around with it etc.
Transitioning your painting business away from these mistakes can be difficult, but I guarantee you it’s worth it. You’ll look back at your business and say, ‘How did I even operate that way?’ Once you start doing things more efficiently and reaping the benefits, you’ll be UNABLE to return to your old ways of running things. Try eliminating just 2 of these mistakes and see what happens!
First off all clients want a "deal" As a painting contractor for 38 years I can tell you that residential-commercial-industrial clients (and their needs are all diffrent. It seems this discussion mostly concerns residential repaints,so here goes--first off ALWAYS get a personal referance from a friend or co-worker. Always get an itemized contract that specifies the prep,color, number of coats, and specifics on payment. Remember you want to set up a relationship with the painting contractor of your choice. Bond, license and insurance are required to get a contractors license and are readily available online at your state Labor and Industries website. Second-- find someone you trust. He or his crew will probably be left alone in your home for most of the time. I always tell my clients that I wont bring someone to their home I wouldnt have in mine. Third--$$ Dont ever pay up front always insist on progress draws if the project is 2 or 3 phases remember If a contractor wants $3000 to do the job and you give him half up front he will be working for $1500. It WILL affect the quality of the product. In 38 years of business I have never taken a deposit and have never not been paid in full remember do what you said you would do for exactly what you said it would cost and there will be no problems with getting paid. one last reminder to clients you are also being evaluated when you interview a contractor. He is sizing you up as well. If he thinks you are a bit sketchy the the price will go up or he wont take the job at all. I have turned down some jobs that looked very profitable on the surface that turned out not to be so.(word gets around fast in the small painting community) Good Luck to clients and contractors
Hi Elaine, We would be happy to get you connected with a painting and wallpaper pro. You can submit a service request on our website: http://www.homeadvisor.com/ or browse reviews for local pros here: http://www.homeadvisor.com/c.html. We can also have a project advisor reach out to assist you if you send your contact information to [email protected] –HASupport

Not only did they paint our home- they also helped reattach a drain pipe that had partially come off the home, removed a small bee or wasps nest hanging off a side of the roof (this was SO nice of them and totally unexpected), and painted over some railings that were in serious need of TLC but were not included in our quote (we didn't ask for them to be painted when James came to meet with us). David asked my husband first about the railings and only painted them when he gave them the okay- it looks so much better and we appreciated this so much! While the painters were working we also had a termite inspection and contractor come over to look at something in the kitchen- David's team had no problem with this and were very accommodating.
After getting more than 5 estimates to get our exterior home painted, we chose this company. It all started when we had James Lee, the owner, present us with a packet when we first met for the estimate with copies of contractors license, insurance, and addresses of his interior/exterior painting jobs. The estimate was very affordable. The 2 workers did an excellent job from start to finish. The job took an estimated 5 days to complete and they cleaned up after themselves every day. This company deserves another 5 Stars from us! Our neighbors will be calling you since they loved the painting job! Great job James! Thank you!
×