On the surface, painting a house seems to be a relatively simple, straightforward task. The idea is basically to get the paint onto a section of wall in an even, continuous fashion without wasting too much in the process. The fact is, though this is the majority of what painting a house involves, it can be a lot more strenuous and difficult than many people think. Sure, it doesn't take a rocket scientist to slop some paint on a roller and go to town, but you don't want to forget about all the prep-work, clean-up, and technique that go into a professional paint job. Add to that the fact that most homeowners do not own the same kind of equipment that a professional Sacramento house painter is likely to have, and the magnitude of this task begins to take shape.

Yes the pricing does change, and quite significantly. I have worked inside the paint industry on counter sales outside sales and application for over 10 years. One thing many people do not understand is, the resins in the paint are more expensive to produce the higher the sheen goes. Therefore the company is at of higher cost making the paint, which in terms they charge more for the paint. I have seen a 15$ variance between flat-semi-gloss it is not uncommon and is not unrealistic to pay more for a higher sheen. Another thing to add is when doing samples on your wall prior to a painter coming is a good idea, however do not do them in huge squares with heavy coats, remember you are just wanting an idea. A lot of times the issue comes up of the paint not covering the sample coats, in fact it is covering quite well, however the paint sample applied is often times much darker than the wall color, creating a contrasting difference from the lighter surrounding wall and the sample placed on the wall. I recommend getting a piece of sheet rock and using it for the samples so you can move around with it etc.
I needed to get the walls by my pool deck resealed and cracks in the stucco replaced. There was also large amounts of cracking/water damage at the bottom of my garage wall. Nick came in to give a quote in a very timely fashion and came in with a very good quote for the repairs. Nick's crew was very friendly and did a good job but, after the original wall sealant settled and dried there were gaps between the concrete and the wall. I notified Lighthouse that there was a problem with the urethane sealant and sent over some pictures. Theresa and Nick had someone come out two days later to fix it and now it looks AWESOME!
the price can always be adjusted based on on or off season, amount of colors to be used. A job like this can be done in 2 days and much quicker with a helper. I charge a bit more than others just because its quality work done professionally. Theres others that charge more than this just because they can on the on season and most people dont get a 2nd bid...
I managed commercial construction projects for many years, have built and remodeled several properties, and never once have I encountered any of these scams. The tone of this article is deeply troubling. The author seems to be saying that ALL painting contractors are inherently dishonest, and that has not been my experience. The underlying advice here is sound: get it all in writing and cover as many contingencies as possible--so pointing out potential pitfalls like coat coverage is helpful. But do that in the spirit of clear communication of expectations, not with the expectation that the person you are hiring will try to cheat you at every turn. Not every contractor takes outrageous advantage of change orders; not every contractor will sneak past necessary preparation and/or repairs. Contractors of all sorts get a bad rap as it is; reinforcing a stereotype with articles written from this point of view just seems unproductive.
O'Neil patches shallow holes and divots with Ready Patch because it dries fast, sands smooth, and stays flexible. Deep cracks and rotten spots are best repaired with two-step epoxies, such as those made by Advanced Repair Technology. (For a step-by-step instructions, see Repairing Rot with Epoxy.) The days of using polyester auto-body fillers on wood are over. "They cure too hard," says Portland, Oregon–based painting contractor Kathleen George. "They look good at first, but then they peel away."

Painting Contractors Co

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